70CD - Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere - Θ4

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Following on from the double CD Theta Three, Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere now release Theta Four early as a single CD, so excited to share the music the minute it is ready (Theta Five not far away)

 

This improvising rock group references the musical innovations of Terry Riley, the swooping exuberance of Alice Coltrane and a mastery of contemporary electronics.
 
Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere still intend a Big Listen, this time round the core six piece group explode into Theta Four from the very first track- a cinematic epic with powerful brooding string arrangements from Martin Archer and the re- introduction of his performance poetry/improvising group Juxtavoices, who chant and improvise their way into a new deep dimension of sound.
The CD continues to surprise and delight with spacious improvisations, composed pieces and all combinations in between, from hypnotic groove-driven drama to " What the hell did I just hear?"
 
Theta Four features some of their best playing yet- virtuoso horns, wind, violin and keys, creative drums bass and percussion and haunting vocal lines. Seamless arrangements evoke an incredible variety of moods across a single CD which is energetic and confident. The musicians complement each other well with sheer enjoyment and it makes for a positive and addictive listen.

 

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Performers

Martin Archer – keyboards, electronics, saxophones, clarinets, flutes, recorders, melodica, voice

 
Steve Dinsdale – electronic drum kit, synth 


frostlake (Jan Todd) – vocals, lyrics, electronics, celtic harp, luke harp, korg wave drum, keyboards, 
bowed electroacoustic bass, idiopan 


Yvonna Magda – violin, electronics 


Walt Shaw – acoustic percussion, electronics, voice

 
Terry Todd – bass and electroacoustic bass guitars



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Following on from the double CD Theta Three, Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere now release Theta Four early as a single CD, so excited to share the music the minute it is ready (Theta Five not far away)

 

This improvising rock group references the musical innovations of Terry Riley, the swooping exuberance of Alice Coltrane and a mastery of contemporary electronics.
 
Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere still intend a Big Listen, this time round the core six piece group explode into Theta Four from the very first track- a cinematic epic with powerful brooding string arrangements from Martin Archer and the re- introduction of his performance poetry/improvising group Juxtavoices, who chant and improvise their way into a new deep dimension of sound.
The CD continues to surprise and delight with spacious improvisations, composed pieces and all combinations in between, from hypnotic groove-driven drama to " What the hell did I just hear?"
 
Theta Four features some of their best playing yet- virtuoso horns, wind, violin and keys, creative drums bass and percussion and haunting vocal lines. Seamless arrangements evoke an incredible variety of moods across a single CD which is energetic and confident. The musicians complement each other well with sheer enjoyment and it makes for a positive and addictive listen.

 

Follow Discus Music on Facebook

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Martin Archer – keyboards, electronics, saxophones, clarinets, flutes, recorders, melodica, voice

 
Steve Dinsdale – electronic drum kit, synth 


frostlake (Jan Todd) – vocals, lyrics, electronics, celtic harp, luke harp, korg wave drum, keyboards, 
bowed electroacoustic bass, idiopan 


Yvonna Magda – violin, electronics 


Walt Shaw – acoustic percussion, electronics, voice

 
Terry Todd – bass and electroacoustic bass guitars

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Martin Archer – keyboards, electronics, saxophones, clarinets, flutes, recorders, melodica, voice

 
Steve Dinsdale – electronic drum kit, synth 


frostlake (Jan Todd) – vocals, lyrics, electronics, celtic harp, luke harp, korg wave drum, keyboards, 
bowed electroacoustic bass, idiopan 


Yvonna Magda – violin, electronics 


Walt Shaw – acoustic percussion, electronics, voice

 
Terry Todd – bass and electroacoustic bass guitars

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Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere from Sheffield, UK with their new album, "Theta Four". The ensemble performs mostly instrumental, complex, dense, theatrically metaphorical and cinematically picturesque Structured Improvisation Music combining lots of influences from various Jazz, Rock, and Classical schools and traditions. Definitely recommended for lovers experimentalism, innovations, and beautiful weirdness in music art.. - R A I G blogspot

 

 

 

Spare me for a few minutes to tell you about an amazing album that came out last month. This album is θ4 (Theta Four), by the incredible Orchestra of the Upper Atmosphere. This experimental album takes you many places, from the atmospheric, almost ambient and contemplative, nebulous threnodies to the upbeat, vigorous, and eclectic parts more reminiscent of some of the more creative progressive rock of the 70s. This album is fabulous and deserves your attention for every minute of its runtime. - Dave Tremblay, HEAVYBLOGISHEAVY

 

 

One of the many symbolic meanings of ‘θ’ (theta), the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, is to signify a special function of several complex variables, and this would seem to apply to the rarefied sonic world of spacious improvisational rock group Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere, whose fourth album to be preceded with “θ”, and their fourth excursion into the sonic wastelands of ego-free music making, I am attempting to dissect here.

Led by the seemingly workaholic Martin Archer in that hive of alternative culture known to us plebs as “Sheffield”, Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere is the closest Martin gets to rock music, among his many other strange, beautiful, occasionally terrifying, and sometimes merely baffling musical outlets. All of this is curated through his long running alternative music label Discus Music. Follow this Bandcamp link for more info.

Dense, but in a good way, this music is also entwining and entangling this willing listener, and it takes me a while to find my way through. We are greeted on departure by hints of an altered state Alice Coltrane, and after an infinitely long journey on the mothership that lasts about a minute we later find ourselves lost in the thickets of a blue frond jungle on the seventh planet of an as yet undiscovered star in the belt of Orion, and it is safe to say that θ4 is best navigated through with an open mind.

Several surprises present themselves, not least the appearance of solid melodic constructions out of the cosmic melange. Particularly so the jazz ensemble blowing through the loose funk rhythms of Essential Light, a tune that would not appear out of place on a Kamasi Washington album. Terry Todd’s loping and loose bass funk is embellished with Steve Dinsdale’s and/or Walt Shaw’s chattering percussion, skittering around the solid bottom end as would several small critters around a recently replenished garden bird table.

This is a pointer that θ4 is more structured than its three predecessors, and unlike those gargantuan blasts of mighty improvisational heft, this is a single CD, so the band have a mere 78 minutes 40 seconds to get their message across. Focus (no, not the band, darn it!) is the key. With their collective eye on the prize, this trip encapsulates fine musicianship with a large sideorder of Kosmische strangeitude, just as it should be.

The track immediately after that unexpected jazz excursion, Displacement, neatly sums this up with its low-key free jazz improv piano overlaid with what sounds like someone searching in vain in the percussion drawer for that elusive set of castanets. Odd, but good! Stranger still is The Life And Death Of A Sewing Machine, where a garbled spoken word litany is declaimed atop some free jazz sax blowing.

ime-Lapsed follows that last one, and plunges us into a warm bath of mellifluous psychedelia that puts me in mind of The Amorphous Androgynous at their most wonky. One thing is for sure, you could never accuse this band of standing still, or of repeating themselves.

The near subsonic bass that suddenly rumbles out of my trusty KEF speakers towards the end of A Widening Road is a blast, but then again I am a sucker for dub treatments. Again percussion driven, this is the sound of the furry animals and the Pict leaving the cave and boogieing on into the heathen night. Marvellous! A glorious almost ska-like beat propels Nanobutterfly for a minute or two before it deconstructs back into a message received from another dimension, and then resurrects the dance. Martin Archer and his merry crew happen across a video of Sun-Ra teaching Jerry Dammers the table manners of the Saturnalian natives over a Bacchanalian feast of unearthly delights.

The mesmerising final track, Edge Of The World, is one of a few to feature the voice-as-instrument beguiling affectations of Martin’s “anti choir” Juxtavoices, and the more conventional vocals of frostlake to very good effect. Hypnotic and languorous, this chilled excursion expands into a kaleidoscopic whorl of space jazz in a manner that should leave a smile on the careworn fizzog of our beleaguered planet as we and it hurtles into oblivion.

Martin describes this album as containing a few “more commercial tracks”, but there’s nothing wrong with that in the slightest. Give it a go, you may be pleasantly surprised! - Roger Trenwith, THE PROGRESSIVE ASPECT

 

 

Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere are a U.K.-based zeuhl ensemble that fuse jazz, neo-classical, and synth-based music into dark, unsettled compositions, positioned at the eclectic and electronic end of the RIO spectrum. The songs that make up the band’s fourth album, Theta Four, radiate a soundscape-y, dystopian aura—and yet, the female vocals, fluid orchestration, and insistent rhythms lend the music a limber quality, a source of motion and drift. Pieces like “The Surface Below” and “The Unquiet Playground” emerge ominously from their ambient beginnings, their shimmering electronics and incidental instrumentation condensing into almost stately dirges of strings, samples, and trippy bass. Even though their songs contain few lyrics, they feel uncomfortably relevant to the current political climate, pointing the listener to a world of uncertainty, confusion and insidious violence. - BANDCAMP DAILY

 

 

Productive Martin Archer operates within several projects. Orchestra of the Upper Atmosphere is 
one of them, presenting their fourth recording. This  ensemble is rooted in rock and excels in repetition-based improvisations. Chris Bywater makes no longer part of crew what makes their sound less electronic. They are guested by a violin-section and cello player, plus a choir. They name Terry Riley, Magma, Sun Ra, krautrock as their inspirations. So they play with the avant-garde from the 70s. Listening to the records I surely had to think of the 70s music too, although it is difficult to pinpoint evident references to music of 
these times. In the first track it are the keyboards that bring back early work by Terry Riley. Every 
now and then I had to think of Jade Warrior. But luckily they are not just interested in reviving and 
copying music of the past. They surely have their own eclectic brew of jazz, prog and electronics. 
They permit themselves very free and abstract interludes in their rock/prog structures. They create 
a very spacious sound to unroll their stretched- out tapestries. The haunting vocals add to the atmospheric and ambient atmospheres.  First three albums were all double CDs. This time we are dealing with a single CD. Long enough to lose any sense of time and to get lost in their spacious soundscapes. - DORF MULDER, VITAL WEEKLY

 

 

Restless imagination and wit - DANIEL SPICER, JAZZWISE 

 

 

Und da ist auch schon Teil vier. Ein gutes Jahr nach dem Erscheinen von "Θ3" legt das Orchestra oft the Upper Atmosphere "Θ4" (Theta Four) vor. Erstmals in der Bandgeschichte handelt es sich "nur" um eine, wenn auch gut gefüllte Einzel-CD. Aber, offenbar war man im Hause Discus so begeistert von den vorhandenen Aufnahmen, dass man nicht warten wollte, bis das Material für eine zweite CD zusammen war. Aber, so kündigt man von Labelseite an, "Θ5" ist schon in Arbeit.

 

Im Vergleich zum Vorgängeralbum haben sich besetzungstechnisch ein paar Dinge verändert. Chris Bywater, langjähriger Wegbegleiter Martin Archers und einer der Mitbegründer des Projekts, hat die Formation nach den Aufnahmen zu "Θ3" verlassen. Damit wurde die elektronische Komponente in der Musik des Orchestra etwas reduziert, wurde doch kein Ersatz engagiert, und ist Steve Dinsdale (von radio massacre international) zudem vorwiegend am Trommeln. Dafür hat Jan Todd (alias frostlake) ihr eingesetztes elektronisches Instrumentarium etwas vergrößert. Trotzdem klingt "Θ4" etwas geradliniger, direkter und weniger sphärisch-ausladend als die Vorgänger.

 

Andererseits ist der Chor Juxtavoices wieder mit dabei (oder eine verkleinerte Abordnung desselben), und auch die Zahl der ein Streichinstrument bedienenden Gäste hat sich im Vergleich zum direkten Vorgänger erhöht (ein veritables Streichquartett ist zu hören). Eventuell fehlendes Elektronikwabern und -schweben wird daher durch allerlei Stimmeinlagen und symphonisch-klangvolle Einwürfe ausgeglichen. Auch Bass und Schlagzeug stehen nun prägender im Mix, so dass "Θ4" wohl das bisher rock-lastigste Werk der Formation ist.

 

Einen recht eigenen Stil pflegt das Orchestra aber weiterhin. Irgendwo im Grenzgebiet von Jazzrock, Retroprog, Avantprog, freierem Klangbasteln und moderner Ensemblemusik bewegt man sich, wobei Gesang, Saxtröten und die eine oder andere perlend-wogende Einlage an E-Orgel und Piano oft an Canterbury-Verwandtes denken lässt, bisweilen auch an Terry-Riley-artige Minimalmusic-Exkurse (vor allem im abschließenden "Edge of the world"). Eine Nummer wie "Essential Light" klingt z.B. ziemlich nach Retro-Canterbury, verbreitet eine sehr authentische, 70er-Jahre-lastige Brit-Jazzrock-Atmosphäre. Gleich anschließend, im kurzen "Displacement", werden dagegen ziemlich frei und schräg Töne vermengt. Zwischen diesen beiden Extremen wandert die Musik auf "Θ4" meist hin und her.

 

Von den vier (bisher erschienenen) Alben des Orchestra oft he Upper Atmosphere ist "Θ4" sicher das am akustischsten klingende (aus den oben erwähnten Gründen). Zudem kommt die Musik etwas erdiger und jazz-lastiger daher. Auch wenn freiformatig-schwebende Momente immer noch reichlich vorhanden sind (man höre z.B. "A widening road"), hat sich doch der Jazz-, Rock- und Prog-Anteil erhöht. Krautiges oder Postrockartiges ist dagegen kaum noch zu vernehmen. In diesem neu gesteckten klanglichen Rahmen ist die Musik von Martin Archer und Kollegen aber immer noch sehr farbig, ausgesprochen komplex verwoben, vielschichtig und abwechslungsreich ausgefallen, ähnelt hier doch kein Stück dem anderen, und sind die Musiker weiterhin sehr virtuos am musizieren. Kurzum: Eine weitere ziemlich einzigartige Sammlung von einer der interessantesten derzeit tätigen Formationen die wirklich progressive Rockmusik machen.

 

 

Wer die Musik des Orchestra of the Upper Atmosphere noch nicht kennt, der sollte spätestens jetzt etwas daran ändern und mit diesem Album in die Klangwelt des Projekts einsteigen. Bei Gefallen kann man sich dann nach hinten durcharbeiten. Ich freue mich dagegen schon auf "Θ5". - Achim Breiling, Babyblaue Seiten

 

 

Lasting almost 13 ¾ minutes, 'Star Gathering' opens the repertoire of the album with a splendid display of refined tribal grooves on which sumptuous arrangements of keyboard and strings are elaborated and expounded. After a hypnotic prologue that rippled in the manner of the first warm lights of a mysterious sunrise, the first central body shows us a fascinating amalgam of diverse colors that are delineated and crisscrossed with stately sobriety. The choral arrangements that go into carving add a timely quota of magical extravagance to the issue while the added percussive hits reinforce the groove. Halfway there, a ceremonious section sung interrupts the celebration to invite us to channel a lyrical moment of meditation that rests on ethereal layers of synthesizers, to later open up to a deconstructive game of cerebral tensions for which the choral arrangements serve as focus. Finally, the last section recovers the tribal and capitalizes it with splendid magnificence. The following 12 ¾ minutes of the repertoire are occupied by the duo of 'The Surface Below' and 'Essential Light', two items that serve for the band to continue expanding in their well-sharpened eclectic musical armaments. The first of these themes is based on random percussive effluvia and abstract contrabass remnants while the orchestrations that revolve around the fickle instrumental framework provide a solipsistic halo that oscillates between the autumnal and the spring. Something mysterious have these orchestral rotations, but not in the style of a gloomy mystery but rather of an arcane whose partial concealment implies an invitation to think about the order of the world with a new look. On the other hand, 'Essential Light' is led by a graceful and stylized fusion engineering that sends us to the WEATHER REPORT of the first three albums. The rhythmically restrained rhythmic scheme and the subtle keyboard arrangements gracefully fit the central motif, whose drawing receives the main strokes of part of the saxophone. What a beautiful subject! Cua ndo comes the turn of 'Displacement', the regime happens to be one of mixed musique concr è con te minimalism based on the confluence of free percussive ornaments, arid effects and LECTRONIC and parkas piano notes. From the last percussion hits and a synthesized layer subterfuge is opened via the next topic, 

'The Unquiet Playground', which brings us back to the dynamism of jazz-fusion with entangled psychedelic framings that now show affinities with certain krautrock paths, and now come together with standards of the so-called acid folk. It is like a solemn and dreamlike hybridization between HERBIE HANCOCK, HARMONY, SUN RA and AKSAK MABOUL, adding some of the most ethereal aspects of JOHN ZORN's polychrome musical vision. The mission of 'The Life And Death Of A Sewing Machine' is to get carried away by the central guidelines of the previous piece and provide a more vibrant density from the legacies of the pieces # 1 and # 3 of the disc, while clothes everything under a mantle designed with free-jazz fabrics: so, we now enjoy something that is, at the same time, celebratory and tense, while wearing his stripes of extravagant exquisiteness. 'Time-Lapsed' immediately turns to record to take us to a more relaxed, even optimistic landscape, based on a striking groove of nu-jazz.  The album ends in a big way with the sequence of three patently ambitious pieces such as 'A Widening Road', 'Nanobutterfly' and 'Edge Of The World'. based on a striking groove in nu-jazz key and a pompous aura like AFTER CRYING in its best times. The violin assumes the leading role while the winds guide the harmonic bases; For their part, the orchestrations wait their turn to absorb the sound nucleus at some point in the intermission, returning later for the germination of the epilogar passage. The album ends in a big way with the sequence of three patently ambitious pieces such as 'A Widening Road', 'Nanobutterfly' and 'Edge Of The World'. 'A Widening Road' revisits the more ethereal dimensions of jazz-progressive vitalism that have already been established in several of the most evocative moments of the previous repertoire; even the ensemble delves into its cosmic subtleties to allow the mix of free jazz and psychedelia that is taking place to be clothed in dreamy tunics. 

 


'Nanobutterfly' establishes a twinning of free-jazz, electronic krautrock and space-rock within a dynamism that is putting together its own skeleton along the way. The weight of synthesizers and cybernetic effects in the elaboration of the captivating nebulous block that fills the contours of the melodic line and the swing of the intermittent central jam clearly indicates that the group wants to give a new twist to its modernist projections . The moment of brilliance of the violin is particularly bright during the second scene of the central jam, while the various interludes show a surreal look based on the synthesized backgrounds and the serious vocal effects. 'Edge Of The World' occupies the last 11 ¼ minutes of the album and does so by expressing warm autumn tones impregnated with warm Dadaism. The smooth handling of the compass in 7/8 and the interventions of candid female vocal arrangements provide serenity resources amidst the latent tension exhibited by the keyboards in their always wavering interventions, and, above all, by the solos of the winds that enter to carve halfway. - AUTOPOIETICAN

 

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Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere from Sheffield, UK with their new album, "Theta Four". The ensemble performs mostly instrumental, complex, dense, theatrically metaphorical and cinematically picturesque Structured Improvisation Music combining lots of influences from various Jazz, Rock, and Classical schools and traditions. Definitely recommended for lovers experimentalism, innovations, and beautiful weirdness in music art.. - R A I G blogspot

 

 

 

Spare me for a few minutes to tell you about an amazing album that came out last month. This album is θ4 (Theta Four), by the incredible Orchestra of the Upper Atmosphere. This experimental album takes you many places, from the atmospheric, almost ambient and contemplative, nebulous threnodies to the upbeat, vigorous, and eclectic parts more reminiscent of some of the more creative progressive rock of the 70s. This album is fabulous and deserves your attention for every minute of its runtime. - Dave Tremblay, HEAVYBLOGISHEAVY

 

 

One of the many symbolic meanings of ‘θ’ (theta), the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, is to signify a special function of several complex variables, and this would seem to apply to the rarefied sonic world of spacious improvisational rock group Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere, whose fourth album to be preceded with “θ”, and their fourth excursion into the sonic wastelands of ego-free music making, I am attempting to dissect here.

Led by the seemingly workaholic Martin Archer in that hive of alternative culture known to us plebs as “Sheffield”, Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere is the closest Martin gets to rock music, among his many other strange, beautiful, occasionally terrifying, and sometimes merely baffling musical outlets. All of this is curated through his long running alternative music label Discus Music. Follow this Bandcamp link for more info.

Dense, but in a good way, this music is also entwining and entangling this willing listener, and it takes me a while to find my way through. We are greeted on departure by hints of an altered state Alice Coltrane, and after an infinitely long journey on the mothership that lasts about a minute we later find ourselves lost in the thickets of a blue frond jungle on the seventh planet of an as yet undiscovered star in the belt of Orion, and it is safe to say that θ4 is best navigated through with an open mind.

Several surprises present themselves, not least the appearance of solid melodic constructions out of the cosmic melange. Particularly so the jazz ensemble blowing through the loose funk rhythms of Essential Light, a tune that would not appear out of place on a Kamasi Washington album. Terry Todd’s loping and loose bass funk is embellished with Steve Dinsdale’s and/or Walt Shaw’s chattering percussion, skittering around the solid bottom end as would several small critters around a recently replenished garden bird table.

This is a pointer that θ4 is more structured than its three predecessors, and unlike those gargantuan blasts of mighty improvisational heft, this is a single CD, so the band have a mere 78 minutes 40 seconds to get their message across. Focus (no, not the band, darn it!) is the key. With their collective eye on the prize, this trip encapsulates fine musicianship with a large sideorder of Kosmische strangeitude, just as it should be.

The track immediately after that unexpected jazz excursion, Displacement, neatly sums this up with its low-key free jazz improv piano overlaid with what sounds like someone searching in vain in the percussion drawer for that elusive set of castanets. Odd, but good! Stranger still is The Life And Death Of A Sewing Machine, where a garbled spoken word litany is declaimed atop some free jazz sax blowing.

ime-Lapsed follows that last one, and plunges us into a warm bath of mellifluous psychedelia that puts me in mind of The Amorphous Androgynous at their most wonky. One thing is for sure, you could never accuse this band of standing still, or of repeating themselves.

The near subsonic bass that suddenly rumbles out of my trusty KEF speakers towards the end of A Widening Road is a blast, but then again I am a sucker for dub treatments. Again percussion driven, this is the sound of the furry animals and the Pict leaving the cave and boogieing on into the heathen night. Marvellous! A glorious almost ska-like beat propels Nanobutterfly for a minute or two before it deconstructs back into a message received from another dimension, and then resurrects the dance. Martin Archer and his merry crew happen across a video of Sun-Ra teaching Jerry Dammers the table manners of the Saturnalian natives over a Bacchanalian feast of unearthly delights.

The mesmerising final track, Edge Of The World, is one of a few to feature the voice-as-instrument beguiling affectations of Martin’s “anti choir” Juxtavoices, and the more conventional vocals of frostlake to very good effect. Hypnotic and languorous, this chilled excursion expands into a kaleidoscopic whorl of space jazz in a manner that should leave a smile on the careworn fizzog of our beleaguered planet as we and it hurtles into oblivion.

Martin describes this album as containing a few “more commercial tracks”, but there’s nothing wrong with that in the slightest. Give it a go, you may be pleasantly surprised! - Roger Trenwith, THE PROGRESSIVE ASPECT

 

 

Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere are a U.K.-based zeuhl ensemble that fuse jazz, neo-classical, and synth-based music into dark, unsettled compositions, positioned at the eclectic and electronic end of the RIO spectrum. The songs that make up the band’s fourth album, Theta Four, radiate a soundscape-y, dystopian aura—and yet, the female vocals, fluid orchestration, and insistent rhythms lend the music a limber quality, a source of motion and drift. Pieces like “The Surface Below” and “The Unquiet Playground” emerge ominously from their ambient beginnings, their shimmering electronics and incidental instrumentation condensing into almost stately dirges of strings, samples, and trippy bass. Even though their songs contain few lyrics, they feel uncomfortably relevant to the current political climate, pointing the listener to a world of uncertainty, confusion and insidious violence. - BANDCAMP DAILY

 

 

Productive Martin Archer operates within several projects. Orchestra of the Upper Atmosphere is 
one of them, presenting their fourth recording. This  ensemble is rooted in rock and excels in repetition-based improvisations. Chris Bywater makes no longer part of crew what makes their sound less electronic. They are guested by a violin-section and cello player, plus a choir. They name Terry Riley, Magma, Sun Ra, krautrock as their inspirations. So they play with the avant-garde from the 70s. Listening to the records I surely had to think of the 70s music too, although it is difficult to pinpoint evident references to music of 
these times. In the first track it are the keyboards that bring back early work by Terry Riley. Every 
now and then I had to think of Jade Warrior. But luckily they are not just interested in reviving and 
copying music of the past. They surely have their own eclectic brew of jazz, prog and electronics. 
They permit themselves very free and abstract interludes in their rock/prog structures. They create 
a very spacious sound to unroll their stretched- out tapestries. The haunting vocals add to the atmospheric and ambient atmospheres.  First three albums were all double CDs. This time we are dealing with a single CD. Long enough to lose any sense of time and to get lost in their spacious soundscapes. - DORF MULDER, VITAL WEEKLY

 

 

Restless imagination and wit - DANIEL SPICER, JAZZWISE 

 

 

Und da ist auch schon Teil vier. Ein gutes Jahr nach dem Erscheinen von "Θ3" legt das Orchestra oft the Upper Atmosphere "Θ4" (Theta Four) vor. Erstmals in der Bandgeschichte handelt es sich "nur" um eine, wenn auch gut gefüllte Einzel-CD. Aber, offenbar war man im Hause Discus so begeistert von den vorhandenen Aufnahmen, dass man nicht warten wollte, bis das Material für eine zweite CD zusammen war. Aber, so kündigt man von Labelseite an, "Θ5" ist schon in Arbeit.

 

Im Vergleich zum Vorgängeralbum haben sich besetzungstechnisch ein paar Dinge verändert. Chris Bywater, langjähriger Wegbegleiter Martin Archers und einer der Mitbegründer des Projekts, hat die Formation nach den Aufnahmen zu "Θ3" verlassen. Damit wurde die elektronische Komponente in der Musik des Orchestra etwas reduziert, wurde doch kein Ersatz engagiert, und ist Steve Dinsdale (von radio massacre international) zudem vorwiegend am Trommeln. Dafür hat Jan Todd (alias frostlake) ihr eingesetztes elektronisches Instrumentarium etwas vergrößert. Trotzdem klingt "Θ4" etwas geradliniger, direkter und weniger sphärisch-ausladend als die Vorgänger.

 

Andererseits ist der Chor Juxtavoices wieder mit dabei (oder eine verkleinerte Abordnung desselben), und auch die Zahl der ein Streichinstrument bedienenden Gäste hat sich im Vergleich zum direkten Vorgänger erhöht (ein veritables Streichquartett ist zu hören). Eventuell fehlendes Elektronikwabern und -schweben wird daher durch allerlei Stimmeinlagen und symphonisch-klangvolle Einwürfe ausgeglichen. Auch Bass und Schlagzeug stehen nun prägender im Mix, so dass "Θ4" wohl das bisher rock-lastigste Werk der Formation ist.

 

Einen recht eigenen Stil pflegt das Orchestra aber weiterhin. Irgendwo im Grenzgebiet von Jazzrock, Retroprog, Avantprog, freierem Klangbasteln und moderner Ensemblemusik bewegt man sich, wobei Gesang, Saxtröten und die eine oder andere perlend-wogende Einlage an E-Orgel und Piano oft an Canterbury-Verwandtes denken lässt, bisweilen auch an Terry-Riley-artige Minimalmusic-Exkurse (vor allem im abschließenden "Edge of the world"). Eine Nummer wie "Essential Light" klingt z.B. ziemlich nach Retro-Canterbury, verbreitet eine sehr authentische, 70er-Jahre-lastige Brit-Jazzrock-Atmosphäre. Gleich anschließend, im kurzen "Displacement", werden dagegen ziemlich frei und schräg Töne vermengt. Zwischen diesen beiden Extremen wandert die Musik auf "Θ4" meist hin und her.

 

Von den vier (bisher erschienenen) Alben des Orchestra oft he Upper Atmosphere ist "Θ4" sicher das am akustischsten klingende (aus den oben erwähnten Gründen). Zudem kommt die Musik etwas erdiger und jazz-lastiger daher. Auch wenn freiformatig-schwebende Momente immer noch reichlich vorhanden sind (man höre z.B. "A widening road"), hat sich doch der Jazz-, Rock- und Prog-Anteil erhöht. Krautiges oder Postrockartiges ist dagegen kaum noch zu vernehmen. In diesem neu gesteckten klanglichen Rahmen ist die Musik von Martin Archer und Kollegen aber immer noch sehr farbig, ausgesprochen komplex verwoben, vielschichtig und abwechslungsreich ausgefallen, ähnelt hier doch kein Stück dem anderen, und sind die Musiker weiterhin sehr virtuos am musizieren. Kurzum: Eine weitere ziemlich einzigartige Sammlung von einer der interessantesten derzeit tätigen Formationen die wirklich progressive Rockmusik machen.

 

 

Wer die Musik des Orchestra of the Upper Atmosphere noch nicht kennt, der sollte spätestens jetzt etwas daran ändern und mit diesem Album in die Klangwelt des Projekts einsteigen. Bei Gefallen kann man sich dann nach hinten durcharbeiten. Ich freue mich dagegen schon auf "Θ5". - Achim Breiling, Babyblaue Seiten

 

 

Lasting almost 13 ¾ minutes, 'Star Gathering' opens the repertoire of the album with a splendid display of refined tribal grooves on which sumptuous arrangements of keyboard and strings are elaborated and expounded. After a hypnotic prologue that rippled in the manner of the first warm lights of a mysterious sunrise, the first central body shows us a fascinating amalgam of diverse colors that are delineated and crisscrossed with stately sobriety. The choral arrangements that go into carving add a timely quota of magical extravagance to the issue while the added percussive hits reinforce the groove. Halfway there, a ceremonious section sung interrupts the celebration to invite us to channel a lyrical moment of meditation that rests on ethereal layers of synthesizers, to later open up to a deconstructive game of cerebral tensions for which the choral arrangements serve as focus. Finally, the last section recovers the tribal and capitalizes it with splendid magnificence. The following 12 ¾ minutes of the repertoire are occupied by the duo of 'The Surface Below' and 'Essential Light', two items that serve for the band to continue expanding in their well-sharpened eclectic musical armaments. The first of these themes is based on random percussive effluvia and abstract contrabass remnants while the orchestrations that revolve around the fickle instrumental framework provide a solipsistic halo that oscillates between the autumnal and the spring. Something mysterious have these orchestral rotations, but not in the style of a gloomy mystery but rather of an arcane whose partial concealment implies an invitation to think about the order of the world with a new look. On the other hand, 'Essential Light' is led by a graceful and stylized fusion engineering that sends us to the WEATHER REPORT of the first three albums. The rhythmically restrained rhythmic scheme and the subtle keyboard arrangements gracefully fit the central motif, whose drawing receives the main strokes of part of the saxophone. What a beautiful subject! Cua ndo comes the turn of 'Displacement', the regime happens to be one of mixed musique concr è con te minimalism based on the confluence of free percussive ornaments, arid effects and LECTRONIC and parkas piano notes. From the last percussion hits and a synthesized layer subterfuge is opened via the next topic, 

'The Unquiet Playground', which brings us back to the dynamism of jazz-fusion with entangled psychedelic framings that now show affinities with certain krautrock paths, and now come together with standards of the so-called acid folk. It is like a solemn and dreamlike hybridization between HERBIE HANCOCK, HARMONY, SUN RA and AKSAK MABOUL, adding some of the most ethereal aspects of JOHN ZORN's polychrome musical vision. The mission of 'The Life And Death Of A Sewing Machine' is to get carried away by the central guidelines of the previous piece and provide a more vibrant density from the legacies of the pieces # 1 and # 3 of the disc, while clothes everything under a mantle designed with free-jazz fabrics: so, we now enjoy something that is, at the same time, celebratory and tense, while wearing his stripes of extravagant exquisiteness. 'Time-Lapsed' immediately turns to record to take us to a more relaxed, even optimistic landscape, based on a striking groove of nu-jazz.  The album ends in a big way with the sequence of three patently ambitious pieces such as 'A Widening Road', 'Nanobutterfly' and 'Edge Of The World'. based on a striking groove in nu-jazz key and a pompous aura like AFTER CRYING in its best times. The violin assumes the leading role while the winds guide the harmonic bases; For their part, the orchestrations wait their turn to absorb the sound nucleus at some point in the intermission, returning later for the germination of the epilogar passage. The album ends in a big way with the sequence of three patently ambitious pieces such as 'A Widening Road', 'Nanobutterfly' and 'Edge Of The World'. 'A Widening Road' revisits the more ethereal dimensions of jazz-progressive vitalism that have already been established in several of the most evocative moments of the previous repertoire; even the ensemble delves into its cosmic subtleties to allow the mix of free jazz and psychedelia that is taking place to be clothed in dreamy tunics. 

 


'Nanobutterfly' establishes a twinning of free-jazz, electronic krautrock and space-rock within a dynamism that is putting together its own skeleton along the way. The weight of synthesizers and cybernetic effects in the elaboration of the captivating nebulous block that fills the contours of the melodic line and the swing of the intermittent central jam clearly indicates that the group wants to give a new twist to its modernist projections . The moment of brilliance of the violin is particularly bright during the second scene of the central jam, while the various interludes show a surreal look based on the synthesized backgrounds and the serious vocal effects. 'Edge Of The World' occupies the last 11 ¼ minutes of the album and does so by expressing warm autumn tones impregnated with warm Dadaism. The smooth handling of the compass in 7/8 and the interventions of candid female vocal arrangements provide serenity resources amidst the latent tension exhibited by the keyboards in their always wavering interventions, and, above all, by the solos of the winds that enter to carve halfway. - AUTOPOIETICAN

 

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Reviews

Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere from Sheffield, UK with their new album, "Theta Four". The ensemble performs mostly instrumental, complex, dense, theatrically metaphorical and cinematically picturesque Structured Improvisation Music combining lots of influences from various Jazz, Rock, and Classical schools and traditions. Definitely recommended for lovers experimentalism, innovations, and beautiful weirdness in music art.. - R A I G blogspot

 

 

 

Spare me for a few minutes to tell you about an amazing album that came out last month. This album is θ4 (Theta Four), by the incredible Orchestra of the Upper Atmosphere. This experimental album takes you many places, from the atmospheric, almost ambient and contemplative, nebulous threnodies to the upbeat, vigorous, and eclectic parts more reminiscent of some of the more creative progressive rock of the 70s. This album is fabulous and deserves your attention for every minute of its runtime. - Dave Tremblay, HEAVYBLOGISHEAVY

 

 

One of the many symbolic meanings of ‘θ’ (theta), the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, is to signify a special function of several complex variables, and this would seem to apply to the rarefied sonic world of spacious improvisational rock group Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere, whose fourth album to be preceded with “θ”, and their fourth excursion into the sonic wastelands of ego-free music making, I am attempting to dissect here.

Led by the seemingly workaholic Martin Archer in that hive of alternative culture known to us plebs as “Sheffield”, Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere is the closest Martin gets to rock music, among his many other strange, beautiful, occasionally terrifying, and sometimes merely baffling musical outlets. All of this is curated through his long running alternative music label Discus Music. Follow this Bandcamp link for more info.

Dense, but in a good way, this music is also entwining and entangling this willing listener, and it takes me a while to find my way through. We are greeted on departure by hints of an altered state Alice Coltrane, and after an infinitely long journey on the mothership that lasts about a minute we later find ourselves lost in the thickets of a blue frond jungle on the seventh planet of an as yet undiscovered star in the belt of Orion, and it is safe to say that θ4 is best navigated through with an open mind.

Several surprises present themselves, not least the appearance of solid melodic constructions out of the cosmic melange. Particularly so the jazz ensemble blowing through the loose funk rhythms of Essential Light, a tune that would not appear out of place on a Kamasi Washington album. Terry Todd’s loping and loose bass funk is embellished with Steve Dinsdale’s and/or Walt Shaw’s chattering percussion, skittering around the solid bottom end as would several small critters around a recently replenished garden bird table.

This is a pointer that θ4 is more structured than its three predecessors, and unlike those gargantuan blasts of mighty improvisational heft, this is a single CD, so the band have a mere 78 minutes 40 seconds to get their message across. Focus (no, not the band, darn it!) is the key. With their collective eye on the prize, this trip encapsulates fine musicianship with a large sideorder of Kosmische strangeitude, just as it should be.

The track immediately after that unexpected jazz excursion, Displacement, neatly sums this up with its low-key free jazz improv piano overlaid with what sounds like someone searching in vain in the percussion drawer for that elusive set of castanets. Odd, but good! Stranger still is The Life And Death Of A Sewing Machine, where a garbled spoken word litany is declaimed atop some free jazz sax blowing.

ime-Lapsed follows that last one, and plunges us into a warm bath of mellifluous psychedelia that puts me in mind of The Amorphous Androgynous at their most wonky. One thing is for sure, you could never accuse this band of standing still, or of repeating themselves.

The near subsonic bass that suddenly rumbles out of my trusty KEF speakers towards the end of A Widening Road is a blast, but then again I am a sucker for dub treatments. Again percussion driven, this is the sound of the furry animals and the Pict leaving the cave and boogieing on into the heathen night. Marvellous! A glorious almost ska-like beat propels Nanobutterfly for a minute or two before it deconstructs back into a message received from another dimension, and then resurrects the dance. Martin Archer and his merry crew happen across a video of Sun-Ra teaching Jerry Dammers the table manners of the Saturnalian natives over a Bacchanalian feast of unearthly delights.

The mesmerising final track, Edge Of The World, is one of a few to feature the voice-as-instrument beguiling affectations of Martin’s “anti choir” Juxtavoices, and the more conventional vocals of frostlake to very good effect. Hypnotic and languorous, this chilled excursion expands into a kaleidoscopic whorl of space jazz in a manner that should leave a smile on the careworn fizzog of our beleaguered planet as we and it hurtles into oblivion.

Martin describes this album as containing a few “more commercial tracks”, but there’s nothing wrong with that in the slightest. Give it a go, you may be pleasantly surprised! - Roger Trenwith, THE PROGRESSIVE ASPECT

 

 

Orchestra Of The Upper Atmosphere are a U.K.-based zeuhl ensemble that fuse jazz, neo-classical, and synth-based music into dark, unsettled compositions, positioned at the eclectic and electronic end of the RIO spectrum. The songs that make up the band’s fourth album, Theta Four, radiate a soundscape-y, dystopian aura—and yet, the female vocals, fluid orchestration, and insistent rhythms lend the music a limber quality, a source of motion and drift. Pieces like “The Surface Below” and “The Unquiet Playground” emerge ominously from their ambient beginnings, their shimmering electronics and incidental instrumentation condensing into almost stately dirges of strings, samples, and trippy bass. Even though their songs contain few lyrics, they feel uncomfortably relevant to the current political climate, pointing the listener to a world of uncertainty, confusion and insidious violence. - BANDCAMP DAILY

 

 

Productive Martin Archer operates within several projects. Orchestra of the Upper Atmosphere is 
one of them, presenting their fourth recording. This  ensemble is rooted in rock and excels in repetition-based improvisations. Chris Bywater makes no longer part of crew what makes their sound less electronic. They are guested by a violin-section and cello player, plus a choir. They name Terry Riley, Magma, Sun Ra, krautrock as their inspirations. So they play with the avant-garde from the 70s. Listening to the records I surely had to think of the 70s music too, although it is difficult to pinpoint evident references to music of 
these times. In the first track it are the keyboards that bring back early work by Terry Riley. Every 
now and then I had to think of Jade Warrior. But luckily they are not just interested in reviving and 
copying music of the past. They surely have their own eclectic brew of jazz, prog and electronics. 
They permit themselves very free and abstract interludes in their rock/prog structures. They create 
a very spacious sound to unroll their stretched- out tapestries. The haunting vocals add to the atmospheric and ambient atmospheres.  First three albums were all double CDs. This time we are dealing with a single CD. Long enough to lose any sense of time and to get lost in their spacious soundscapes. - DORF MULDER, VITAL WEEKLY

 

 

Restless imagination and wit - DANIEL SPICER, JAZZWISE 

 

 

Und da ist auch schon Teil vier. Ein gutes Jahr nach dem Erscheinen von "Θ3" legt das Orchestra oft the Upper Atmosphere "Θ4" (Theta Four) vor. Erstmals in der Bandgeschichte handelt es sich "nur" um eine, wenn auch gut gefüllte Einzel-CD. Aber, offenbar war man im Hause Discus so begeistert von den vorhandenen Aufnahmen, dass man nicht warten wollte, bis das Material für eine zweite CD zusammen war. Aber, so kündigt man von Labelseite an, "Θ5" ist schon in Arbeit.

 

Im Vergleich zum Vorgängeralbum haben sich besetzungstechnisch ein paar Dinge verändert. Chris Bywater, langjähriger Wegbegleiter Martin Archers und einer der Mitbegründer des Projekts, hat die Formation nach den Aufnahmen zu "Θ3" verlassen. Damit wurde die elektronische Komponente in der Musik des Orchestra etwas reduziert, wurde doch kein Ersatz engagiert, und ist Steve Dinsdale (von radio massacre international) zudem vorwiegend am Trommeln. Dafür hat Jan Todd (alias frostlake) ihr eingesetztes elektronisches Instrumentarium etwas vergrößert. Trotzdem klingt "Θ4" etwas geradliniger, direkter und weniger sphärisch-ausladend als die Vorgänger.

 

Andererseits ist der Chor Juxtavoices wieder mit dabei (oder eine verkleinerte Abordnung desselben), und auch die Zahl der ein Streichinstrument bedienenden Gäste hat sich im Vergleich zum direkten Vorgänger erhöht (ein veritables Streichquartett ist zu hören). Eventuell fehlendes Elektronikwabern und -schweben wird daher durch allerlei Stimmeinlagen und symphonisch-klangvolle Einwürfe ausgeglichen. Auch Bass und Schlagzeug stehen nun prägender im Mix, so dass "Θ4" wohl das bisher rock-lastigste Werk der Formation ist.

 

Einen recht eigenen Stil pflegt das Orchestra aber weiterhin. Irgendwo im Grenzgebiet von Jazzrock, Retroprog, Avantprog, freierem Klangbasteln und moderner Ensemblemusik bewegt man sich, wobei Gesang, Saxtröten und die eine oder andere perlend-wogende Einlage an E-Orgel und Piano oft an Canterbury-Verwandtes denken lässt, bisweilen auch an Terry-Riley-artige Minimalmusic-Exkurse (vor allem im abschließenden "Edge of the world"). Eine Nummer wie "Essential Light" klingt z.B. ziemlich nach Retro-Canterbury, verbreitet eine sehr authentische, 70er-Jahre-lastige Brit-Jazzrock-Atmosphäre. Gleich anschließend, im kurzen "Displacement", werden dagegen ziemlich frei und schräg Töne vermengt. Zwischen diesen beiden Extremen wandert die Musik auf "Θ4" meist hin und her.

 

Von den vier (bisher erschienenen) Alben des Orchestra oft he Upper Atmosphere ist "Θ4" sicher das am akustischsten klingende (aus den oben erwähnten Gründen). Zudem kommt die Musik etwas erdiger und jazz-lastiger daher. Auch wenn freiformatig-schwebende Momente immer noch reichlich vorhanden sind (man höre z.B. "A widening road"), hat sich doch der Jazz-, Rock- und Prog-Anteil erhöht. Krautiges oder Postrockartiges ist dagegen kaum noch zu vernehmen. In diesem neu gesteckten klanglichen Rahmen ist die Musik von Martin Archer und Kollegen aber immer noch sehr farbig, ausgesprochen komplex verwoben, vielschichtig und abwechslungsreich ausgefallen, ähnelt hier doch kein Stück dem anderen, und sind die Musiker weiterhin sehr virtuos am musizieren. Kurzum: Eine weitere ziemlich einzigartige Sammlung von einer der interessantesten derzeit tätigen Formationen die wirklich progressive Rockmusik machen.

 

 

Wer die Musik des Orchestra of the Upper Atmosphere noch nicht kennt, der sollte spätestens jetzt etwas daran ändern und mit diesem Album in die Klangwelt des Projekts einsteigen. Bei Gefallen kann man sich dann nach hinten durcharbeiten. Ich freue mich dagegen schon auf "Θ5". - Achim Breiling, Babyblaue Seiten

 

 

Lasting almost 13 ¾ minutes, 'Star Gathering' opens the repertoire of the album with a splendid display of refined tribal grooves on which sumptuous arrangements of keyboard and strings are elaborated and expounded. After a hypnotic prologue that rippled in the manner of the first warm lights of a mysterious sunrise, the first central body shows us a fascinating amalgam of diverse colors that are delineated and crisscrossed with stately sobriety. The choral arrangements that go into carving add a timely quota of magical extravagance to the issue while the added percussive hits reinforce the groove. Halfway there, a ceremonious section sung interrupts the celebration to invite us to channel a lyrical moment of meditation that rests on ethereal layers of synthesizers, to later open up to a deconstructive game of cerebral tensions for which the choral arrangements serve as focus. Finally, the last section recovers the tribal and capitalizes it with splendid magnificence. The following 12 ¾ minutes of the repertoire are occupied by the duo of 'The Surface Below' and 'Essential Light', two items that serve for the band to continue expanding in their well-sharpened eclectic musical armaments. The first of these themes is based on random percussive effluvia and abstract contrabass remnants while the orchestrations that revolve around the fickle instrumental framework provide a solipsistic halo that oscillates between the autumnal and the spring. Something mysterious have these orchestral rotations, but not in the style of a gloomy mystery but rather of an arcane whose partial concealment implies an invitation to think about the order of the world with a new look. On the other hand, 'Essential Light' is led by a graceful and stylized fusion engineering that sends us to the WEATHER REPORT of the first three albums. The rhythmically restrained rhythmic scheme and the subtle keyboard arrangements gracefully fit the central motif, whose drawing receives the main strokes of part of the saxophone. What a beautiful subject! Cua ndo comes the turn of 'Displacement', the regime happens to be one of mixed musique concr è con te minimalism based on the confluence of free percussive ornaments, arid effects and LECTRONIC and parkas piano notes. From the last percussion hits and a synthesized layer subterfuge is opened via the next topic, 

'The Unquiet Playground', which brings us back to the dynamism of jazz-fusion with entangled psychedelic framings that now show affinities with certain krautrock paths, and now come together with standards of the so-called acid folk. It is like a solemn and dreamlike hybridization between HERBIE HANCOCK, HARMONY, SUN RA and AKSAK MABOUL, adding some of the most ethereal aspects of JOHN ZORN's polychrome musical vision. The mission of 'The Life And Death Of A Sewing Machine' is to get carried away by the central guidelines of the previous piece and provide a more vibrant density from the legacies of the pieces # 1 and # 3 of the disc, while clothes everything under a mantle designed with free-jazz fabrics: so, we now enjoy something that is, at the same time, celebratory and tense, while wearing his stripes of extravagant exquisiteness. 'Time-Lapsed' immediately turns to record to take us to a more relaxed, even optimistic landscape, based on a striking groove of nu-jazz.  The album ends in a big way with the sequence of three patently ambitious pieces such as 'A Widening Road', 'Nanobutterfly' and 'Edge Of The World'. based on a striking groove in nu-jazz key and a pompous aura like AFTER CRYING in its best times. The violin assumes the leading role while the winds guide the harmonic bases; For their part, the orchestrations wait their turn to absorb the sound nucleus at some point in the intermission, returning later for the germination of the epilogar passage. The album ends in a big way with the sequence of three patently ambitious pieces such as 'A Widening Road', 'Nanobutterfly' and 'Edge Of The World'. 'A Widening Road' revisits the more ethereal dimensions of jazz-progressive vitalism that have already been established in several of the most evocative moments of the previous repertoire; even the ensemble delves into its cosmic subtleties to allow the mix of free jazz and psychedelia that is taking place to be clothed in dreamy tunics. 

 


'Nanobutterfly' establishes a twinning of free-jazz, electronic krautrock and space-rock within a dynamism that is putting together its own skeleton along the way. The weight of synthesizers and cybernetic effects in the elaboration of the captivating nebulous block that fills the contours of the melodic line and the swing of the intermittent central jam clearly indicates that the group wants to give a new twist to its modernist projections . The moment of brilliance of the violin is particularly bright during the second scene of the central jam, while the various interludes show a surreal look based on the synthesized backgrounds and the serious vocal effects. 'Edge Of The World' occupies the last 11 ¼ minutes of the album and does so by expressing warm autumn tones impregnated with warm Dadaism. The smooth handling of the compass in 7/8 and the interventions of candid female vocal arrangements provide serenity resources amidst the latent tension exhibited by the keyboards in their always wavering interventions, and, above all, by the solos of the winds that enter to carve halfway. - AUTOPOIETICAN